Windows – Piano, Dog, Cat and Abstract

Abstract, Alaska, Black & White, Film, Photography, Portraits, Street, Travel

Above: Piano lessons at night through a window in the University of Washington district. Shot on a Kodak Retine IIIc, 35mm film.

Windows, the current weekly photo challenge, can mean many things. Look in or out a window to see opposites. Eyes are windows. A window of time carries heavy implications. Windows are simultaneous openings and reflections. Insight into others and self. 

Throughmylens posted two wonderful windows to look through – one in British Columbia and one in Italy. 

Im excited to feature film frames this post. I have been neglecting film recently, so it’s good stimulant to shoot and process more. Two are film, the abstract black and white and the color frames are film. 

WPC: Unexpected, On Seattle Streets

Photography, Street, Travel, Weekly Photo Post

Above: A leashed cat sits on a chair in downtown Seattle, Washington.

Unexpected is the current weekly photo challenge, and what a great challenge it is for photography. Photographers live for the unexpected, I constantly scour scene and surrounding looking for good light, an event or the unexpected.

As the saying goes, “expect the unexpected.” Fantastic advice to increase success in any endeavor. When it comes to photography “expecting the unexpected” often means a split-second reaction – always have a camera ready. It can also mean working a scene longer until some action develops – be patient.

My images from the unpredictable streets of Seattle; juxtaposed birds and early-bird special sign, a young woman stretching on drift wood on the waterfront, gorgeous light cascading into Pikes Place Market, and a row of neatly arranged lunch boxes in a barren entryway. 

Click on any image to view in carousel.

Pre- and mid-yawn cat diptych

Alaska, Black & White, Film, Photography, Portraits

The title pretty much says it all. I was just shooting a few frames of my cat Carlos sitting in the sun when he opened wide for a yawn. The two frames were mere seconds apart. I feel it’s hard taking pictures of pets that are not simply snapshots. One way to change the aesthetic could be trying different gear, editing or processing techniques. Much of my aesthetic comes from shooting film. Another way is to turn it into a study with multiple images. In this case a study of a cat yawning. Of course I couldn’t have anticipated his sudden inhale, but also would’t have caught it had I not just taken the preceding picture. It could be argued only one picture is needed, but I think the combination of the two paints a more complete picture, allowing the viewer to get an idea of the cats appearance.